July is Disability Pride Month!

Updated: Jul 12



Did you know that July celebrates Disability Pride Month? On July 26, 1990 the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was passed to prohibit discrimination against people with disabilities.


At Thrive, over half of the people we work with on a monthly basis experience disability. Some receive income assistance through SSDI or SSI, some are in the application process for these programs, and others do not qualify or choose not to participate in this type of cash assistance (it comes with a lot of restrictions). We welcome those with disabilities, and work to connect folks with supports in the community that elevate their standard of living.


The more you know: What is SSI?

While Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a supportive assistance program for people with a documented disability, it is far from perfect. The program requires an in depth application process, that requires medical or mental health records that reflect a level of disability that keeps someone from being able to earn what is considered a “livable amount” of income. The length of the process can span from several months to years, depending on the records and the disability they reflect. Navigating this timeline can be nearly impossible if you have no family or friends available for financial support.

If you are approved and receive SSI, you will receive a maximum of $841/mo. (2022 standard). If you are working to supplement your SSI income you need to pay close attention to income restrictions. You are also not allowed to accumulate more than $2000 in a bank account, or you may lose benefits.


If this is news to you, we encourage you to learn more about disability, how you can better support those that experience disabilities, and teach your friends and children about disability without stigmatizing 💙


Here is a great thread from the website The Valuable 500, a global business collective doing innovative work in disability inclusion:




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We at Thrive Central Oregon believe that Black History should be celebrated during each month of the year, as the history (past and present) of Black Americans is tied to all of us, regardless of race